15 Reasons You Should Never Drink Soft Drinks – Coke, Pepsi Health Effects

15 Reasons You Should Never Drink Soft Drinks – Coke, Pepsi Health Effects

15 Reasons You Should Never Drink Soft Drinks – Coke, Pepsi Health Effects
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Are you consuming Pepsi / Coke or carbonated soft drinks regularly? Here are some strong reasons you should never drink these soft drinks. Between 1970 and 1997, the consumption of carbonated soft drinks was increased to 86%. The relation between the consumption of energy drink and health effects is considered by many health researches. The strong reasons for avoiding carbonated soft drinks are provided in this article.




  1. Major Contributor to Obesity

A strong association between increased energy consumption and obesity is found in many researches. An important contributor to obesity is soft drink. Children and adults are majorly affected by overweight due to soft drink consumption. Soft drinks have been banned and limited by many schools in USA, UK and France.

  1. Contributor to Diabetes

Consumption of soft drinks leads to energy overconsumption which is a significant contributor to diabetes. Studies identified that sugar-sweetened soft drinks are the major cause for type 2 diabetes. Another study has identified a strong relation between soft drinks and physiological abnormalities and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Contributor to Cardio Vascular Diseases / Heart Attacks

The risk factors for metabolic syndrome, which includes Cardio Vascular Diseases are increased by Soft drink consumption.

  1. Causes Calcium Deficiency and Reduces Bone Mineral Density

Excess intake of energy from soft drinks is highly associated with lower intake of healthy foods. Consumption of soft drinks displaces the sources of calcium like milk. Reduced bone mineral density and calcium deficiency are the effects of soft drink consumption. Increase of soft drink consumption also increases the possibilities for bone fracture.

  1. Associated with Kidney Stones

A positive relation was found between soft drink consumption and kidney stone. Studies identified that soft drink consumption controls the intake of potassium and calcium. Consuming little calcium in food or less calcium intake causes formation of kidney stone.

  1. Tooth Decay / Cavities

Studies identified that there is a strong association between carbonated soft drinks and dental caries. However, the positive association was not identified between diet soft drinks and dental caries.

  1. Increase Blood Pressure

Both diastolic and systolic blood pressure are caused by over consumption of sucrose-sweetened soft drinks and beverages. An experimental study also found the relation between the consumption of caffeinated soft drink and systolic blood pressure.

  1. Associated with Decreased intake of Protein

Decreased intake of protein in a human body is associated with carbonated soft drink consumption. Moreover, soft drink consumption is also associated with decreased intake of fruits and other nutrients.

  1. Associated with Liver damage

Long-term consumption of soft drinks increases risks for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease based on a social research.

  1. Linked to DNA ageing and cell Damage

A study identified that consumption of 350ml carbonated soft drink causes DNA change which changes cells 4.6 years older. Regular consumption of soft drinks results in accelerated DNA ageing.

  1. Effect on Fertility

Another study identified that cola based soft drinks may cause semen quality, menstrual disorders, ovulatory and pregnancy miscarriages.

  1. Effect on Pregnancy

Soft drink consumption may lead to fetal arrhythmias (increase or abnormal heartbeat) during pregnancy. The risk of low birth weight (LBW) is another effect of soft drink intake during pregnancy.

  1. Increased risk of Asthma

Increased risk of asthma is caused by regular consumption of carbonated soft drinks.

  1. Sleep Disorder

High caffeine in soft drinks increases possibilities for sleep disorder. However, consumption of caffeine may not create significant health hazards to individuals.

  1. Mental health effects and Depression

A recent study identified that there is an association between soft drink consumption of mental health. The study identified that adults who drink soft drinks are facing depressive symptoms.

 

So, It’s time to Quit Carbonated Soft Drinks


 

Reference

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Imai, A., Ichigo, S., Takagi, H., Matsunami, K., Suzuki, N. amd Yamamoto, A. (2010). Effects of cola intake on fertility: a review, Health Journal, 2(9), 997-1001

Raben, A., Vasilaras, T.H., Møller, A.C. and Astrup, A. (2002). Sucrose compared with artificial sweeteners: different effects on ad libitum food intake and body weight after 10 wk of supplementation in overweight subjects, American Journal of Public Health, 76(4), 721-9.

Shi, Z., Grande, E., Taylor, A.W., Gill, T.K., Adams, R., Wittert, G.A. (2012). Association between soft drink consumption and asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults in Australia. Respirology, 17(2), 363-9

Vartanian, L. R., Schwartz, M. B., and Brownell, K. D. (2007). Effects of Soft Drink Consumption on Nutrition and Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, American Journal of Public Health, 97 (4), 667-675

Yoo, S., Nicklas, T., Baranowski, T., Zakeri, I.F., Yang, S.J., Srinivasan, S.R., Berenson, G.S. (2004). Comparison of dietary intakes associated with metabolic syndrome risk factors in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study. American Journal of Public Health, 80(4), 841-8.

Yu, B., He, H. and Zhang, Q. (2014). Soft drink consumption is associated with depressive symptoms among adults in China, Journal of Affect Disorder, 172, 422-427

Zelber-Sagi, S., Nitzan-Kaluski, D., Goldsmith, R., Webb, M., Blendis, L., Halpern, Z. and Oren, R. (2007). Long term nutritional intake and the risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Journal of Hepatol. 47(5), 711-7.